Category Archives: noise

Lingua Ignota ‎- Caligula (2019)

Discogs.com

The new Lingua Ignota reminds me even more of Diamanda Galas than the previous album. The music is mostly piano with singing, but frequently Ignota goes over in the tortured screams that we know her for.

Where “All Bitches Die” has more and more pomp electronics, the new album goes back more to what Ignota appears to be trained in: piano and soprano vocals. There is more classical music here too, cello and violin.

It is quite interesting to look at the (guest) musicians by the way. There is a vocalist who Discogs has listed as playing both folk and “harsh noise” and there seem to be links to Uniform and The Body and from there on with hardcore and grind bands. I guess Ignota did not just drop out of some classical music school and started to make extreme vocal music.

“Caligula” is a moody (in an extreme way) album. Not as sonically extreme as the previous album, but certainly vocally.

Links: Lingua Ignota, Profound Lore

Consumer Electronics – Airles Space (2019)

Discogs.com

I did not see this one coming. A new Consumer Electronics. A cd even, with a very ugly cover too!

“Airless Space” is not as brutal as Consumer Electronics can be. Most tracks are centered around the slow, steady beat that we know from previous albums. The male vocals are of the spoken words type in most tracks and the brutalism is for Sarah who screams her lungs out in many of the tracks.

Here and there the sounds gets a bit harscher, but there are no “Come Clean” wall-of-noise type tracks (unfortunately).

When you know this long running noise outfit, you will know what to expect with the above. Should Consumer Electronics be new to you, this could be an album to try since it is fairly typical and brutal vocal-wise, but a lot less so music-wise.

Links: Consumer Electronics, Harbinger Sound

Ten Thousand Miles Of Arteries – Survival Bloom (2019)

Discogs.com

I ran into this album on the Annihilvs Bandcamp page where it can be obtained digitally and physically. The name did not immediately ring a bell, but this Chicago based project has been around for well over a decade it seems.

Spotify proves to have two releases of this project (a split and a full-length). Both are noise, not too extreme, but not exactly “ambient noise” either. I am not too fond of the vocals on these releases. I like the vocals a lot better on “Survival Bloom”. They are fairly typical for this type of music: brutally screamed vocals, but I often have a soft spot for vocal noise, so…

“Survival Bloom” appears to be a bit more industrial than the other two releases that I heard, slow, pulsating rhythms, mostly low frequencies (my preference) and, mostly accompanying the vocals, high frequency noises. It may not be brilliant, but the album is pretty enjoyable. Not too extreme and not too chaotic, but pretty brutal. I guess it is no accident that this was released on Annihilvs.

Link: Annihilvs

Am Not – Incursions (mc 2018)

Discogs.com

The excellent Am Not released a tape on Zaetraom, lining him with other excellent noise projects such as Anenzephalia and Ke/Hil.

On “Incursions” Tamon Miyakita goes from his magnificent death industrial and dark wall-of-noise style with brutal vocals to more tranquil tunes, somewhat ambient or even soundscape-like perhaps even.

Also there are guest musicians. Hermann Kopp in the second track (vocals, not violin), S.T.A.B. Electronics (whom I discovered because the project share labels) and two ladies, one of whom also cooperated on “The Developing World“.

“Incursions” opens brilliantly and brutally. Also “What Are You Waiting For” is a great track. The cooperation with S.T.A.B. Electronics worked out well and (as can be expected) the track is pretty harsh. I am less convinced by the more tranquil tracks, even though I do like the industrial, but not very noisy, “Cruth Do Bhaile”.

Previously I reviewed the “appendix” which also has a more tranquil track that I like less than the other tracks. What occurs to me playing “Incursions” is that the noise on these last two releases is more of the harsh type and less of the structured kind of the two brilliant full-lengths. Even though I do like the more extreme tracks of Am Not, I like the structured tracks a lot better than the more tranquil tracks that seem to have replaced them.

Let us see in what direction Am Not develops.

Link: Am Not

Offerbeest – Afrika (2018)

Discogs.com

As the name of this project suggests, it is from the Netherlands. It means ‘sacrificial animal’. Offerbeest is actually one of the projects of the man behind Gnaw Their Tongues, an interesting dark doom metal project. I do not know if I knew if that came from my homeland though. He also appears to be active in the nice noise project Aderlating.

“Afrika” is the second of three Offerbeest albums and is released by Malignant, so well available (even though the physical copies are limited to 300).

It is but a half hour album with with noise music. Layers of distorted sounds, drumming or more industrial rhythms and distorted vocals. The album has a few nice tunes here and there. I like the tracks “I Am The One” and “Cut Out Their Hearts” which are fairly typical noise tracks with brutal vocals, but the other tracks are not too much to my liking. The sound is a bit too chaotic for me perhaps. Nothing to do about that.

You can listen to this album on Spotify or Bandcamp. When you want a physical copy, be quick about it.

Link: Malignant Records

Control, Geneviéve Pasquier, Kommando – Cold War, Hot Love (12″ 2018)

Well well, a collaboration album between three industrial giants: Thomas Garrison, Geneviève Pasquier and Dan Courtman. Their respective projects (that is to way, one of each), are named, so would the result be collaborations, or tracks of each project? I am not entirely sure!

Among the eight tracks it is fairly easy to recognise the different styles. There are wall-of-noise type tracks that remind of Control. There is one Pasquier track which is fairly industrial in sound on her scale, but it is still Pasquier. Some industrial tracks obviously have Courtman’s vocals. Over the entire album, it looks like Garrison had quite some influence. Of course we all know that our friendly Thorofon couple also does not shun sonic brutality. Perhaps the tracks are collaborations after all.

When you like Pasquier and later Thorofon, “Cold War, Hot Love” may be more brutal than you are used to. When you do like the rougher side of these projects, especially when you can appreciate a Control sauce, this album just might be just what you are looking for. I like it, that is for sure! Too bad that it is not released on cd though.

Links: Control, Geneviève Pasquier, Ant-Zen

Deathpanel – Age Of Insignificance (cd 2018)

Tesco comes with a loud debut album of this new German outfit. “Age Of Insignificance” mostly contains violent noise and death industrial, with here and there a little gas off.

After a great death industrial opening follow a couple of noise tracks (less rhythm). These styles alternate until my favorite track of album, the title track, a wall-of-sound type track with brutal vocals in the middle. The vocals are varied from undistorted screaming to talking to a sound that is almost unrecognisable as a voice. There is not much focus on vocals. Where some music in the style has screaming lads from the beginning until the end, Deathpanel usually only has vocals in a part of the track. A couple of tracks contains good sample-work giving these track extra atmosphere.

Of the eight tracks presented, half I like a lot and the other four are still good. Indeed a promising debut.

Link: Tesco

Am Not – First Morbid Vibrations (2012/2017)

I got to know Am Not when he released the great second album “Unpunished” (2015). A while ago another good album was released (“The Developing World” 2017). Then I learn that Am Not’s debut tape from 2012 has been rereleased on cd.

I had already heard this 34 minute debut, so I knew it is not as good as the later albums. An artist can develop, right? “First Morbid Vibrations” opens with a great, dark, noise track. Then follows a more ambient track and the third tracks starts off quite quietly too, but we soon go over in complete noise mayhem, a pretty damn dark piece of wall-of-sound style noise. Track 4 is again more ambient and the fifth a somewhat strange kind of fairly extreme noise, but not very chaotic of sound. The closing track is one of these extreme, high-pitched, unstructured noise, the not-my-kind type of noise, tracks, that is to say, I have heard much worse noise. Perhaps I will get used to this track.

It is safe to say that the album starts well, but develops in a negative way, but certainly without getting bad. The larger part is still pretty good. Not as good as the meticulously created later albums and I miss the vocals, but this is a descent document of a time past,
People who are curious about the debut of Am Not can now get a copy on cd.

Links: Am Not, Unrest Productions

Detrimental Effect – To Brandon Bryant (mc 2017)

Once again thanks to Noise Receptor for bringing this tape to my attention. It was Noise Receptor who introduced me to Am Not and hence Unrest Productions, now I learn about an Unrest sublabel, Unsound.

What is a bit weird is that Unrest releases cds, vinyl and tapes and Unsound also releases tapes and according to Discogs also vinyl. Noise Receptor understands that Unsound aims at cheaper productions that can be released with higher speed. Indeed, the three Unsound tapes that I got come in cardboard sleeves with black and white printing, while the Unrest tapes that I have come in a normal case.

That said, Detrimental Effect makes a not too extreme kind of noise with pulsating rhythms and rough, screamed vocals. Perhaps the sound is somewhat akin to that of Anenzephalia here and there. For some reason when there are vocals in noise (or voice samples) the music is ‘plussed up’ in my head. Detrimental Effect has a bit of the Unrest style of not too complex noise, but with vocals. There is good use of samples in the background, not too many high pitched sounds and plenty of low frequencies, another element that raises my ratings. The atmosphere is certainly descent and the sound is often that of good-old industrial noise, but not the chaotic, unstructured style.

This is Detrimental Effect’s debut release and it surely is promising.

Link: Unsound Recordings

Trepaneringsritualen – Kainskult (cd 2017)

Late 2013 I heard of Trepaneringsritualen because Distel cooperated to an album. The styles of these projects have little alike. Where Distel is more of an “angstpop” type of project (especially in the earlier days), Trepaneringsritualen makes very dark “death industrial”. I did (nor do) like all material, but some albums are great and live performances are too.

I got quite some material of this “Götisk dödsindustri” project, but it often sounds quite alike. Therefor the project dropped on my priority list.

I am very glad that I gave “Kainskult” a try though! This album sounds as exciting as when I first encountered this project. All known elements are still there, but as Tesco’s selling text says: “somehow it reaches a new level of intensity”. Among earlier material there already were tracks with less distortion, but on “Kainskult” Thomas Ekelund experimented with his common elements again together with a whole host of fellow conspirators. One of them is Michael Idehall who I think sings on the great and moody opening track. Also there is Kim Larsen who I think sings on the magnificent closing track. Between these two tracks there are Trepaneringsritualen tracks that are somewhat more uptempo than the usual material, Ekelund’s vocals moved more towards a kind of rhythmic growling with more text than just a few lines. Walls of dark noise, hammering on metal and well-placed drumming, “Kainskult” without a doubt contains Trepaneringsritualen’s best material so far. Distel returned as conspirator as the mixer of this album

Links: Trepaneringsritualen, Tesco