Category Archives: quotes

Freemasonry is the most recent form of Tradition

The thinkers of the Age of Enlightenment, based on the premise that truth can only be secured from experience, maintained that Tradition, the voice of the past, the authority exerted by the ancient thinkers, could only cause harm as it constituted a prejudice hindering a clear unimpeded vision. Furthermore, as a consequence of their anti-historic attitude, the enlightened concluded that prior to the eighteenth century there had only been errors, barbarism, obscurantism. But on the contrary, Freemasonry is the most recent form of Tradition, and similar to all traditional forms gathers and conveys in an uninterrupted chain all aspects present from the beginning, unchanged by the ravages of time, beyond the realm of history and time. In the context of Tradition the transmitting of primary principles occurs in a vertical fashion, from super humans to humans, implying perfection from its very outset. The means best suited to instelling knowledge of the truth of a higher order associated with this Tradition is represented by symbolism, a tool that has been rejected or ignored by the modern world, which views truths as belonging to the order of pure intellectuality

Fabio Venzi in Studies In Traditional Freemasonry p. 31/2

Freemasonry is not deist

Yet others have defined the Masonic school of thought as “deist”, which is even more ridiculous. It is an established fact that in the deist doctrine thre is no place for a relationship between God and man; God exists but is in no way involved in the historic events of man. Then how can the contant references to “assistance” of The Great Architect Of The Universe in our rituals be explained?

Fabio Venzi in Studies On Traditional Freemasonry p. 33

The Open Mouth

Gap Var Ginnungaga = “The Open Mouth of the Sacred Descendants was (existed)”. From gap = “open mouth” (indicating something ready to swallow something), var = “was”, “existed”, ginnr = “sacred” and unga = genitive plural of ungr = “descendant”, “child”, “lineage”.

Maria Kvilhaug in The Poetic Edda p. 6 (note 5)

In the beginning was the Wave

Ar var alda = “In the beginning was the Wave” is a very controversial interpretation that is not found in other translations. My interpretation is based in the understanding that ár is the ON adverb ór which means “in the beginning”. It follows that var (“was”) refer to the singular noun which was in the beginning, namely alda, which, when a singular noun, means “wave” (feminine singular). Traditionally, the sentence is taken to mean “early in the old times” or “early in the beginning”, understanding alda as a form of alðr, meaning “age”. My interpretation is, however, literal, grammatically correct and also entirely probable.

Maria Kvilhaug in The Poetic Edda p. 6 (note 5)

Ahriman the carnivore

In those days flocks were not plentiful, and living creatures were rarely killed for eating. Except for herbs men had nought to eat and it was the ground that produced all, until Ahriman, the Evil-doer, conceived and lodged in the minds of men the thought of killing animals. Out of every genus both of birds and quadrupes he contrived eatables, making use of all. With their blood he fed Zahdak, as though it were milk, in order to make him stout of heart.

Shanameh III.ii (Levy’s translation p. 7)

Albert Pike on Freemasory for women

But there is no reason why there should not be also a Masonry for them, which may not merely enable to make themselves known to Masons, and so to obtain assistance and protection; but by means of which, acting in concert through the tie of association and mutual obligation, they may cooperate in the great labors of Masonry, by assisting in and, in some respects, directing their charities, and toiling in the cause of Human Progress.

Albert Pike in the introduction of his Rite for women, quoted by Karen Kidd.

Paradoxical expressions

The disproportion between the natural virtues and those having a supernatural essence or between those tainted by a secret vanity and those that are pure and deep implies that virtues of the second category may be at times less apparent than those of the first and that a certain spiritual modesty may even conceal them. It may also be
that some inner reality, misunderstood from without, may seem to contradict them.

In a similar manner gnosis sometimes gives rise to paradoxical expressions, which in reality indicate theualitative separation between the profane and spiritual planes; but this discontinuity is only one aspect alongside another that is more important, that of analogy and essential continuity.

Frithjof Shuon in Prayer Fashions Man