Author Archives: Roy

Harry Potter

Usually, when something is popular, it drops on my list of preference (should it have made it’s way there in the first place). Harry Potter is one such thing. The fact that they are kids films does not help either.

Twice, at uncommon times when I was ‘zapping around’ on TV, I ran into a Harry Potter scene in which the kids were repotting Mandragoras. When you know that a Mandragora is an alchemical symbol for a plant that is also a little man (homunculus), that scene is pretty funny. For many years I was mildly curious if more such elements have found their way into the films, scenes in with ‘inside jokes’. read more

Sacred space

The requirement of delimiting the “sacred” space wherein the ritual will be performed consequently implies an additional characteristic of Freemasonry and all initiatic societies: secrecy. The latter term however does not indicate actions conduct in the shadows, but rather a need to remain “segregated” from the rest of the world, to confine oneself to a “sacred” space in which to seek contact with a higher dimension, removed from the rest of the world lingering in a state of chaos and instability. It is solely by means of detachment from the cacophony of everyday life that the vertical pathway can be approached. read more

Masonic degeneration

Undeniably, during the eighteenth century “several” Masonic bodies in Europe introduced the principles of enlightenment into their rituals, this distorting their esoteric and initiatic origins. In these Obediences the ritual has gradually been deprived of its true symbolic significance and replaced by commentaries and exegeses characterised by a desolating banality and a dull moralism reminiscent of the “century of Enlightenment“. This “progressivist” degeneration of the principles of Freemasonry has consequently led to a misconceived interpretation of the concept of Fellowship, increasingly construed as an independent “individual subject” invested with a real power within the context of sociopolitical confiness, or levelling out into a form of essentially moral and material soliddarism. read more

Masonic continuity

Is there any degree of continuity between the Medieval “Operative” Masons and the modern “Speculative” Freemasons? Personally I am do not hold with the idea of a temporal continuity, although it is however undeniable that the “operative” Freemasonry to some extent inspired the choice of Masonic symbols. Indeed, Tradition of which Freemasonry is a “form”, was established following the inspiration of numerous other lesser traditions, as the intuition of a being needs to be provoked or assisted through human actions in so far that the crafts may be consecrated: thus, each utensil, each gesture of the craftsmen may be seen as the symbol of a step towards the intuition of a perfect being. read more